• “The smartest historical sci-fi adventure-romance story ever written by a science Ph.D. with a background in scripting 'Scrooge McDuck' comics.”—Salon.com
  • A time-hopping, continent-spanning salmagundi of genres.”
    —ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY
  • “These books have to be word-of-mouth books because they're too weird to describe to anybody.”
    —Jackie Cantor, Diana's first editor

Introduction to Ivanhoe

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Purchase the Book

In 2001, Diana wrote an introduction for Modern Library’s paperback edition of the classic IVANHOE, by Sir Walter Scott. At left are links to buying this edition from multiple booksellers.

Note that the Poisoned Pen bookstore offers autographed and personalized versions signed by Diana as an option. Be sure to specify that you want an autographed copy, and any personalization (such as “To Sue”) in the comments box when you check out on the Poisoned Pen’s site.

The Modern Library edition of IVANHOE is the only one with Diana’s introduction included. Other publishers’ versions may have introductions written by others.

Description of IVANHOE

From the Poisoned Pen’s web page:

Hailed by Victor Hugo as ‘the real epic of our age,’ Ivanhoe was an immensely popular bestseller when first published in 1819. The book inspired literary imitations as well as paintings, dramatizations, and even operas.

In the twelfth century, Sir Wilfred of Ivanhoe returns home to England from the Third Crusade to claim his inheritance and the love of the lady Rowena. The heroic adventures of this noble Saxon knight involve him in the struggle between Richard the Lion-Hearted and his malignant brother John: a conflict that brings Ivanhoe into alliance with the mysterious outlaw Robin Hood and his legendary fight for the forces of good.

‘Scott’s characters, like Shakespeare’s and Jane Austen’s, have the seed of life in them,’ observed Virginia Woolf. ‘The emotions in which Scott excels are not those of human beings pitted against other human beings, but of man pitted against Nature, of man in relation to fate. His romance is the romance of hunted men hiding in woods at night; of brigs standing out to sea; of waves breaking in the moonlight; of solitary sands and distant horsemen; of violence and suspense.’ For Henry James, ‘Scott was a born storyteller. . . . Since Shakespeare, no writer has created so immense a gallery of portraits.’