• “The smartest historical sci-fi adventure-romance story ever written by a science Ph.D. with a background in scripting 'Scrooge McDuck' comics.”—Salon.com
  • A time-hopping, continent-spanning salmagundi of genres.”
    —ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY
  • “These books have to be word-of-mouth books because they're too weird to describe to anybody.”
    —Jackie Cantor, Diana's first editor

P.S. Where the Short Pieces Are (aka Chronology of the novellas and short stories)

P.S. WHERE ALL THE SHORT PIECES ARE:

“Lord John and the Hellfire Club” (short story—14,000 words) – originally published in the anthology PAST POISONS, edited by Maxim Jakubowski. Also published in the collection titled LORD JOHN AND THE HAND OF DEVILS. This story _precedes_ the novel LORD JOHN AND THE PRIVATE MATTER.

“Lord John and the Succubus” (novella – it’s around 25-30,000 words) – originally published in the anthology LEGENDS II, edited by Robert Silverberg. Also published in the collection titled LORD JOHN AND THE HAND OF DEVILS. This story _follows_ the novel LORD JOHN AND THE PRIVATE MATTER, and comes _before_ the novel LORD JOHN AND THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE BLADE.

“Lord John and the Haunted Soldier” (novella – 25-30,000 words) Written for and available _only in_ the collection titled LORD JOHN AND THE HAND OF DEVILS. This story _follows_ the novel LORD JOHN AND THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE BLADE.

LORD JOHN AND THE HAND OF DEVILS is a _collection_ of three stories/novellas: “Hellfire Club,” “Succubus,” and “Haunted Soldier. It is available in hardcover, trade paperback, and mass-market paperback, and in an ebook version. (The Poisoned Pen bookstore can provide _any_ of my books in _any_ format, autographed/inscribed, and will ship anywhere in the world. www.poisonedpen.com .)

“The Custom of the Army” (novella – 28,000 words) Written for (and so far available only in) the anthology WARRIORS (NB: The paperback edition of this book was published in three volumes; “The Custom of the Army” is in the third volume, “WARRIORS 3”), edited by George R.R. Martin and Gardner Dozois. This story _follows_ “Lord John and the Haunted Soldier,” and _precedes_ the novel THE SCOTTISH PRISONER.

“A Leaf on the Wind of All Hallows” (short story – approx. 18,000 words) originally published in the anthology SONGS OF LOVE AND DEATH, edited by George R.R. Martin and Gardner Dozois, October 2010. Now available in hardcover and mass-market paperback. This story deals with Roger MacKenzie’s parents, Jerry and Dolly, during WWII.

THE SCOTTISH PRISONER (novel – 150,000 words). Published in US and Canada by Random House (and Random House Canada), available in hardcover and ebook versions. Will soon be released in trade paperback. Published in the UK by Orion; available in hardcover and trade paperback (and, I hope, ebook, but don’t know for sure). This book _follows_ “The Custom of the Army”, _precedes_ “Lord John and the Plague of Zombies,” and is a _hybrid novel_, using both Jamie Fraser and Lord John Grey as main characters.

“Lord John and the Plague of Zombies” (novella – about 24,000 words) originally published in anthology titled DOWN THESE STRANGE STREETS, edited by George R.R. Martin and Gardner Dozois. This story _follows_ THE SCOTTISH PRISONER, chronologically.

“The Space Between” (novella – about 40,000 words), to be published in an anthology titled THE MAD SCIENTIST’S GUIDE TO WORLD DOMINATION, edited by John Joseph Adams. It will be published by Tor, presumably later in 2012, but there is no pub date set yet. This story concerns Michael Murray (Ian’s elder brother), Joan MacKimmie (Marsali’s younger sister), the Comte St. Germain (naturally he’s not dead, what are you thinking?), Mother Hildegarde, and a few other people. Jamie and Claire are there in spirit.

“Virgins” (short story (theoretically) – no idea how long it is, because I’m still writing it). To be published in the anthology DANGEROUS WOMEN, edited by George R.R. Martin and Gardner Dozois. No pub date, but quite possibly later in 2012. This one is about Jamie (aged nineteen) and his friend Ian (aged twenty) as young mercenaries in France.

Yes, eventually some of these pieces will very likely be published as e-shorts, collected into a single volume, or both. When they are, I’ll tell you; stay tuned!

P.S. That green book up there is the Dutch edition of THE SCOTTISH PRISONER

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39 Responses »

  1. Diana

    Thanks for all the detailed information on the availability of the various short stories and novellas. I have several of the anthologies mentioned and they are quite good.

    • I have to tell you I have been through all the stories I can get my hands on and have loved every one of them!! I am or have not been a big reader in the last few years but found one book and it’s sequel I really likes and my daughter and sister told me if I likes that I should try a Book Called Outlander by Diana Gabaldon.
      Well I have loved them so much it is incredible.
      If these were but on film it just has to be done right not a Chop shop half hearted debacle. That would be my biggest fear.
      But done right this series would be bigger than the Star Wars series.
      So much stories such great characters and the settings would be just eye candy!
      I do hope it’s done and done right!
      My suggestion to all if you find anything that Diana Gabaldon has written, Get it and read it, save it to read again. Then tell everyone you know about it.

  2. That is a beautiful cover of The Scottish Prisoner. I love seeing the other covers, I have a UK version of ECHO and I love it. I got while I was in Ireland in Belfast.

  3. Thank you for the concise list of what’s what and what’s where – actually, I do HAVE everything (published so far) but it is certainly helpful to both know that, and also to know where every story ‘fits’.

    Granted there’s not a writer in this world that writes fast enough to suit me, but for your books and stories, I will wait, and gladly so. After all, your books are always so rewarding upon the second reading – and the third, and the fourth…

  4. I admit I was reluctant to start Lord John. I thought I would be too frustrated waiting for a glimpse of my favorite Scot, but you’ve turned me around. I even left a review of the book saying how I have been converted to enjoy Lord John also. I guess you had more depth to his character floating around in your head than I picked up on by reading the Outlander books, but you were undoubtedly limited (because it wasn’t LJ’s POV). However, these books allow you to really bring out the best in him. I respect him more as a person instead of the prison warden/advancer of unwanted attention, etc. I’ve enjoyed the books, and I honestly can’t believe you are the same author for both story lines. It really FEELS like a totally different read.

  5. SPOILER ALERT – Comments
    I have adored Lord John’s character from the moment he tried to save Claire from being ravished by the Scots! He has been noble and kind, and clever from the very start for me. Diana developed Lord John’s character to be so much more when he took on the guardianship of William, and demonstrated that he prioritized his friendship with Jamie over his lust for him. Lord John’s nurturing of young William, and the thoughtfulness he showed towards the Dunsaney’s old and young show his innate chivalry. His support of Brianna when she found herself pregnant at River Run. The way Lord John did not hesitate for a moment in handing over Hector’s precious ring when Jamie asked for a gem. Lord John’s protection of Claire when they thought Jamie lost…..
    Lord John is a gentleman in the true sense of the word.
    Thank you Diana for creating such a mufti-faceted and likeable character. I constantly marvel at your ability to imbue your characters with such ‘soul’ and ‘humility’ ‘humour’ and ‘reality’. It is no wonder that your devoted readers are so impassioned. I am on my umpteenth re-read and barely a chapter goes by without me thinking, you are a genius!

    • Oh, Jane… well done! (I find myself looking for a “like” button…. hmmm, must be spending too much time on facebook. ;) )

      • Jane, I feel just the same as Barbie, searching that “like” button! You’ve described exacly what I feel.
        I thanks Diana for all the those wonderful hours of mind traveling…

    • Jane – I am in total agreement with you! I’ve always loved John’s character and was excited to read the books devoted to him. The more we learn about him, the more I adore him, but I was never *not* in his camp.

      This is such a great list Diana, thank you! I tried to do something similar myself before starting Scottish Prisoner, but I couldn’t remember all the details well enough to do it successfully. I think I’m gonna go in chronological order through all these Lord John stories once I finish my re-read of the main Outlander series!

    • I agree entirely! Don’t forget John Cinnamon, the baby from Custom of the Army, who showed up again as an adult in Echo. When Percy said John took care of everyone, John didn’t agree with him, but maybe John doesn’t recognize his own qualities at times or took him too literally.

  6. Thanks for the list Diana…I have been collecting Lord John (although I did succumb to reading Scottish Prisoner) and will eventually read them. As many of your fans we are anxiously awaiting book 8 and all the other stories that are in your brilliant mind.
    I do have a question in regard to how you write. How do you come up with the other stories for the shorts and novellas? Since many of these are extensions to the story of main Outlander series.

  7. Thank you very much! I have not kept up with the short (ahem) stories and have wanted to start collecting them but was always confused about who, where, when, why.

  8. I just want to say that you should not appear anywhere or blog but just write, write, write the next Outlander book. I just finished “Echo” and I am going to have a hard time waiting for the next book! I don’t want to read the teasers!!!!! UGH! I think that going to your daughters wedding is okay but the rest – skip them! :)

    I’ve read these books over and over and my dog’s name is James Alexander Malcolm MacKenzie Fraser – Jamie for short…… he’s 8 years old :)

    Please, ignore your family and friends and life for us readers who just want Jamie and Claire back together again………

    Sincerely,
    Obsessed!

  9. Just in case anybody’s wondering, the cover of the WARRIORS 3 paperback shown above is actually much better-looking in reality. It’s not a bright pink, as shown here, but a very pretty shade of coral. :-)

    Karen

  10. Thanks for answering my question I posted on your FB page. Looks like I have some reading to do!

  11. @Jane… Well said. Actually very well said! @Barbie & KathyB….. Ditto!

  12. Greetings–Have you heard about the stone circle in British Columbia that scientists are studying? In the middle of a brownish-green plateau sits these bright white stones in a circle of about 50 meters wide. The circle was thought to be a man made site at first, but they have decided it’s a result of natural forces, “an extraordinarily geometric gift from about 10,000 years ago.” Just made me think of our time-travelling friends:)

  13. Diana,

    Thanks for this thorough update. I have most all items listed, but see that I’m short a couple of books, Zombies, for sure. I have Scottish Prisoner, but have not yet read it, as I’m still going thru my (4th) re-read of the Outlander series.

    Quite frankly, going thru Echo again, in anticipation of MOHB, I tend to rush thru the military stuff, always anxious to hear more about Bree and Roger and the children, and letters from Jamie and Claire, and then back to J & C, etc, etc. I know the military stuff is essential, but it just doesn’t hold me like the interpersonal stuff for which you, Diana, are so, deservedly, well known. I do love the way you’ve interspersed the story lines, it keeps me hopping!

    Also: thank you, Diana, for the methadone list. I have picked up several books by authors on that list, and am enjoying Connie Willis very much. Being a devoted Christmas story person, I am really enjoying her Miracle, and Other Christmas Stories. Different, but enthralling. Recently I’ve also taken some time off to read the Odd Thomas books by Dean Koontz. I know he wasn’t on your list, but my son is a devoted fan, so I tried them. I think they are a fun easy read, also drawing on emotions and other-worldly stuff.

    While we are not always as patient as we might be, we all know that when MOHB is done we’ll all love it. Sure hope your book release tour will include the Tattered Cover in Highlands Ranch, CO, again.

    And, as always, THANK YOU for MANY hours of reading pleasure, escape, and enjoyment. You are the BEST!

    Judith

  14. I have always been among the ranks of those who enjoy reading about Lord John. But it has been throughout the Outlander series..and not from a short story nor specific novel about him. That is (hopefully) changing as one of my friends is bringing ‘The Scottish Prisoner” with her on her next visit.

    Do you know if your distributor has a regular channel of your works (in English) in Israel?

    Amazon of course is reliable…but I prefer to browse in a book store for my purchases.

    Thanks, Eileen

  15. Dear Diana,

    Just a quick note to say Thank you, Thank you, Thank you for posting the list of novella’s and the anthologies clearly. I got so confused before and now I can go get the anthologies with the “short stories” that are missing from my collection. You rock!

    Cheers
    Maggie
    PS: Love your books and you inspire me to write even if the stories are just for me.

  16. Hey Diana.

    I just finished ordering your Lord John short stories/novellas via kindle. I’m really looking forward to reading them! Thanks so much for making the list available.

    I have a question for you – will the other books in the Outlander series be printed in a format similar to the 20th anniversary edition of Outlander? I’d really like my books to be similar. I’ve got a touch of OCD, can you tell? ;-D

    Thanks so much for your riveting series. They’re my favorite books.

    Kate

    • Dear Kate–

      I really don’t know; whether to do 20th anniversary editions of the other books is up to the publisher (Random House). I’ll ask, though!

      –Diana

  17. Dear Diana -

    I have to add my name to this list of followers. I discover your books throug Julie Garwood that also writes about highlinders. I must confess that at the beginning I was afraid to start reading something that keeps going and going. I like to know the ending. But you got me hook. I love to watch TV and since I started reading the Outlander series, I have been recording my shows, but have no idea when I will get to them. The books consume my life. I am on the last one – Echo… and will start with the Lord John series as I finish. I love the fact that you let us know in which order to read them and I am really looking forward to this series. I figure that I will read little by little so maybe by the time that I am done. The new one will be close to release.

    I think that you have a great imagination and I love it. I don’t know how you do it, how you can come up with all this smalol stories surrounding the big one. It is amasing. I love Jamie and Claire, and Roger and Brianna, and every body else. If I have to picture Jamie I have to say that it is Gerard Butlers, specially in this older years, and with his reasent picture at the grammys.

    Thanks for your wonderful writing. I can barely wait for the next one.

  18. Diana – I’ve not ever posted a comment because what I have to say is certainly not new or novel. However, with this recent blog post about all the novellas and short stories I just have to say I continue to be enthralled by your giftedness. I have read them all (the published novellas and shorts) and so enjoy the way they come alongside the Outlander series and make it richer. The way you write and weave all the pieces together in this amazing tapestry that is the “story” is brilliant.

    I participate in 2 book clubs and am an avid reader of many genres. I am also employed by the publishing industry which means I’m reading all kinds of material for work as well and I must say that what you do with your “gift” is rare. The fact that you also manage to have a life outside the world of the creative machine that is your ‘work’ ie: family, community, travel and things that are “other” – makes you genius!

    Since I’m posting, I also wanted to say that I love the character of Father Anselm. He’s not often mentioned but he is quite special. Any chance he’ll reappear in a future work?

  19. Thanks for the list Diana. I was recently ‘looking’ for the reference/story of Roger’s parents.

    LR

    • Just finished listening to “Plague of Zombies”. Enjoyed it…SPOILER ALERT!

      I am amazed and in awe at your ability to weave characters and background explanations into these shorter pieces! Mrs. Abernathy and Ishmael certainly made this story very interesting. I’d forgotten about Ishmael’s lower extremity…

      Now on to Roger’s parents.

      Thanks for the enjoyment!

      Loretta Remington

  20. Oh! this made me so happy! I’ve been trying to read all of the Lord John stories but kept feeling like i must be missing something. (I was, ‘Custom of the Army’ and ‘Plague of Zombies’) Also, I had no idea that the story about Roger’s parents was published already.

    I always thought of your books as being great stand-alone stories, but after rereading Echo with the Lord John stories and Scottish Prisoner in mind I understood (or was at least able to make connections with) SO MUCH more! I got a thrill the moment Percy showed up and I knew the back story already. (also i was reminded of your daily lines when things like Joan and Micheal traveling to France came up)

    I’ll have to pick up ‘Warriors’, ‘Down these strange streets’, and ‘Songs of Love and Death’… I assume since you didn’t include that they’re available in ebook format that they’re not.

    Do you know if the ‘Mad Scientist’s Guide’ and ‘Dangerous Women’ will be available as ebooks? (I buy hardcopies of my favorite books, but its sooo much easier when I don’t know if I’ll enjoy the _whole_ book)

  21. Hi Diana,

    I have just spent the last three and a half months reading your Outlander series. I am now going through withdrawals. I think I have to look around and see what else I must do in my life besides read.

    It will be hard to wake up and not wonder what is going to happen to Jamie and Claire today.

    Thank god it is almost spring and I can go outside and dig in the dirt.

    ‘Til the next one……………..Thanks.

    • Hello Martha,

      I empathize with your ‘Outlander’ withdrawals.

      There is a cure!

      Start reading them from the beginning again, straight away!

      You will be amazed at how marvellous and re-readable the series is, the second and third and …… time.

      Or perhaps, start again with the audio versions. I often listen to my ‘Outlander’ audios whilst driving, doing housework, after lights out when my husband is snoring……

      You could even combine digging in the garden with listening to the series.

      I do read other authors but none hold a candle to Diana’s genius.

      Welcome to D.G. Anonymous!

      Warmest regards
      Jane

  22. Dear Diana,

    Thank you very much for the chronology, I had been mixing some of these up with each other, so this is very helpful.
    Yesterday, I read your excerpt on Facebook (loved it!!!) and wanted to attract your attention to a detail: in 18th century France, the spelling would most definitely have been “Philippe” and not “Phillipe”. Even in modern France, I’ve never met a Phillipe (and it’s one of the most common male first names in my generation). There are quite a few in Quebec, though…
    Sorry for being a nitpicker. :)

  23. Hi Diana -

    I recently purchased Songs of Love and Death – specifically for your contribution, although I did enjoy most of the other stories as well. I have to say that the ending haunts me and I’m wondering if the scene on the stairs was inspired by true events?

    Also (maybe another commenter can help me here) it is noted at the end of “A Leaf on the Wind of All Hallows” that we can find more about the men who rescued Jerry in “Echo in the Bone” and although I’ve read it twice I can’t remember coming across this scene. Can someone please point me to the general point in the novel?

    One last thing. I’ve been enjoying the Outlander casting polls you have running on Facebook and I’m curious if you have ever been surprised by any of the fan picks? And by that I mean either surprised at how well they have chosen, or surprised by how shockingly they are wrong!

    Have a great day!

    • Dear Rayleen–

      Oh, I just roll my eyes and try not to look, when it comes to the casting discussions. In re Jerry and the two men–there’s not a scene, _per se_ about that in ECHO, but an implication: to wit, we know that Roger and Buck went back through the stones to find Jeremiah. And they did. [g]

      Bethnal Green Tube station _did_ collapse when bombed during the war, though I didn’t know that until I began doing the research for “Leaf.” But Roger had said earlier (I think in FIERY CROSS) that his mother died in the bombing of a Tube station, and he described her then as having saved his life by throwing him off the stairs before the roof fell in.

      –Diana

  24. Hi Diana,

    I read The Scottish Prisoner because Jamie was in it. Loved it. Then I read The Brotherhood of the Blade because I’d been told that Jamie was in it. Loved it. Then, I went on to read the novellas as well not because of Jamie, but now because of John. I got to know John and his family in Prisoner and Brotherhood and, if I loved him before because of his goodness to Jamie and his family, I now love him in his own right and look forward to reading books about John because they’re about John .

    I still have a couple of Lord John stories to read (Zombies and another one – don’t remember right now) and I’m really looking forward to it. I’m sure that when I re-read the series (you know we can’t stop doing that) I’m sure I’ll look at John with greater insight and understanding. Love these folk. Thank you.

    DiForBooks

  25. Balzac called his work the Human Comedy, but Diana Gabaldon does it even better. Every type of character, every type of love, every type of experience appears in her books. Jamie and Claire’s love story is so rewarding because they live their marriage vows– for better or for worse, indeed!
    These books are also a fascinating introduction to history, not just because they are brilliantly written but also because they are brilliantly researched, with the minute, telling detail that makes them real.(The recipe for making candles was spot on, according to an aunt)
    What a gift you have, Diana! I am in awe of your powers of storytelling. And immensely grateful…

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